Are you thinking about getting a roommate? Trying to find a roommate is a smart move to make as a renter. Getting a roommate can help you financially, by cutting the rent in half or more. You also have a buddy built into your living situation, which can be a lot of fun. 

“That sounds great,” you’re thinking, “but where do I even find a roommate?” We know that the roommate search can be overwhelming. That’s why we’ve made this handy list of places where you can find a roommate, with descriptions of each so that you can decide what method is best for you.

Friends and Family

Yes, you could always go the friends-and-family route. It’s a choice that has its upsides: these people already know you and your living habits. You know you can trust them and that you enjoy spending time with them. These are all strong pros.

However, you might want to consider what you’ll do if things don’t go well. Unfortunately, even if you enjoy being around someone, you still might not like living with them. (For example: your friend’s chattiness might be endearing for a few hours, but not for a few months or years.) If things end up going downhill, you might end up damaging a relationship you really valued. 

This isn’t to say that living with family or friends is a bad idea! Plenty of people do it with great success. Just be thoughtful and smart about it and you’ll be fine.

Facebook Groups

One easy way to find a roommate is via Facebook groups. In pretty much every area in the country, there are Facebook groups about looking for housing and roommates. By joining and posting in a few of these, you’re likely to end up with a few different choices you can narrow down. Since you’re already on Facebook, you’ll already be able to see some information about your potential roommates that will help you make decisions.

You don’t only have to use the groups relevant to housing, of course. If you’re in any college alumni groups, you might also be able to find a roommate through those. That way, you can use your social circles to get more information on the people you find. You can also post in Facebook groups you might be using due to your identity. For example, if you’re in a Facebook group for LGBTQIA+ folks or Black folks in your area, you could try posting in those to see if you can find a roommate.

Roommates.com

On Roommates.com, you can make a free profile and browse other people’s profiles for free. However, if you get a message from an interested roommate, you’ll need to get a paid subscription to message back. The lowest tier of this subscription is $5.99 for three days.

Because the site is paid, you’re likely to find a roommate on Roommates.com who wants to move in together relatively quickly. You’re also less likely to find scammers, because they won’t want to spend money on the subscription. Be careful anyway, of course!

find a roommate

Roomi

Roomi is a roommate-finding app and site. You can make a profile, create a listing, and talk to potential roommates for free. However, if you want your profile verified so that other people can be sure you’re not a scammer, you’ll have to pay for one of Roomi’s subscription versions. If you don’t feel the need to get verified, Roomi might serve as a better option for you if you don’t want to pay for Roommates.com. Plus, the app makes it easier to use on your phone, which can be a pretty big upside nowadays.  

RoomEasy

RoomEasy is laid out a little differently than Roomi and Roommates.com. In a Tinder-esque fashion, you make a profile with your interests and lifestyle, and then you can match with potential roommate options. You can browse listings or individual roommates. If you’re looking to gamify your roommate-hunting experience, this might be a good way to go about it.

You’ve Found Some Potential Roommates––Now What?

You might be wondering what else to think about once you’ve narrowed your roommate search down to a few potential options. We have a few other Dwellsy posts to help you as you find a roommate.

  • Here are some things to keep in mind during your roommate search. We’re here to make sure that you ask all of the right questions and take everything into consideration!
  • Concerned about your roommate raising your rent? Maybe you need a roommate, but you’re worried that your landlord will raise the rent if you get one. This post should walk you through that possibility.
  • When you and your new roomie are ready to move in together, consider writing a roommate agreement. This is your fallback plan in case you disagree about your house rules or come into some other conflict. No matter who you choose to live with, we’d advise signing a roommate agreement. (Yes, it can even be helpful with family!)

We hope that these tips and suggestions lead you to the perfect roommate for you! Best of luck on your search.

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