Life as we have known it is changing as a result of COVID-19.  Employees able to work from home are being asked to do so. Schools across the country are closing.  Venues that serve large audiences have shut down. In some locations, citizens are being asked to shelter-in-place to maximize the benefits of social distancing.  With all of this change, it’s important to safeguard your mental health.

This crisis is presenting a whole new set of considerations for both homeowners and renters.  Some are relegated to homes with an abundance of space. Others are grappling with how to manage families of all sizes in floor plans with limited square footage.

Alongside logistical adjustments, there’s an emotional toll that is just starting to ripple throughout.  Uncertainty is raising more questions than answers at this time. Ambiguity can be deeply unsettling to many.  Not only will renters need to be vigilant in managing their physical health during this pandemic, renters must also safeguard their mental health.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC), has an excellent website with information about managing anxiety and stress.

The World Health Organization (WHO) published this piece that lists 31 recommendations to consider while adjusting to this temporary, new normal.

Another valuable resource comes from Ginger, whose mission is to reinvent “mental health care by coupling data science and virtual delivery to provide immediate, personal support for anyone.”  Erica Hayes recently published an article that puts forth some great practices to manage working from home.

Here are 7 things to consider in safeguarding your mental health:

1. Develop a daily routine that incorporateS some aspect of structure

2. Limit access to news and updates; turn off live updates

3. Seek out connection with friends and family through alternate means of communicating

4. Step into natural light each and every day; if possible, go outside. otherwise, open a window, stand on a balcony, look outside and remember > we live within a community and together, we will get through this

5. Allow for added flexibility in regards to your expectations of others; life partners, roommates, children, friends, parents

6. Acknowledge your feelings completely, name what you’re worried about, verbalize your emotions to someone you trust, move through the emotion

7. Focus on what you can control

To safeguard your mental health, a proactive approach to checking in with how you’re feeling is necessary.

If you feel overwhelmed and need immediate help, here is a resource with information.

Please reach out to us at Dwellsy via erika@dwellsy.com to share how you are taking care of yourself and your loved ones during these unprecedented times.

Check out these renter tips and then visit Dwellsy.com to find a rental and make it home.